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Monday, January 14, 2013

Start-up Business: When is the Best Time to Consult with a Lawyer?

If you are starting a new business, it is vital that you assemble your team of advisors immediately. Many entrepreneurs are short on cash during the start-up phase, and forego retaining legal counsel or other professional advisors in order to preserve capital for other aspects of the business venture. But this approach is usually penny-wise and pound-foolish. And many small business start-up lawyers are a lot more affordable than you think.

Your attorney can be an invaluable member of your team of advisors. These professionals have seen first-hand the mistakes entrepreneurs make, and know how to help you avoid them. It is best to consult with your attorney early on in the process, before you formally organize the company; the foundational issues are critical to the long-term success of your new venture.

There are many issues to be considered; and the earlier you do so, the better. You’ll want to ensure you choose the most advantageous business structure. From C-Corporations to S-Corporations to Limited Liability Companies and other hybrid entities, you have many options. They must all be carefully considered, in light of your particular situation. How many owners and who they are, liability issues, licensing restrictions, and anticipated profits all play a role in determining what type of entity affords you the most asset protection, and costs you the least in taxes.

During this foundational process, your legal advisors can also help you determine equity splits, which can save you headaches down the road. For example, it is generally advisable to avoid dividing business ownership according to percentages. Doing so can create problems later if additional investors need to be brought in. However, if the appropriate number of shares are authorized at the outset, and issued according to a plan for long-term company growth, you ensure your company can access capital in the future.

Even after your initial formation is complete, there are still a number of legal issues that require your attention. There are agreements to negotiate which may include leases, employment contracts, independent contractor agreements, customer purchase or service agreements and many more.

Steps should be taken early on to protect your intellectual property. Depending on the nature of your business, you may need to obtain and enforce patents and copyrights. If your company has a “brand” you will likely want to obtain a federal or state trademark to protect it for your own exclusive use.

The federal and state employment regulations can be onerous. From verboten interview questions to potential allegations of discriminatory hiring practices, a start-up lawyer can help you avoid the pitfalls and ensure you have a happy, productive work force.

Finally, your attorney can help you identify and secure other professionals and services, such as accountants, recruiters, bankers and even start-up friendly print shops and website development and hosting services.


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